Grillin’ Syllables {with giveaway}

One of the best parts of summer? The grill! I’ve got a ton of kiddos working on multisyllabic words so I whipped this game up! Time for Grillin’ Syllables Grillin’ Syllables is a new game for speech therapy targeting multisyllabic articulation of words. I developed a new game targeting these 3-5 syllable words featuring the summer grill theme!  78 multisyllabic words with pictures are included.  Print all food cards. Print each student one game board (page 3). Use blank cards to include student specific learning targets. Laminate all materials, but most importantly the student game boards. Give each student one game board and one dry erase marker. Place the cards in the center of the group.  On each turn, the student should pull a card from the center pile. Read the multisyllable word. Check the included grill food at the top of the card and mark that item off on your game board.  If you draw a special ‘burnt it!’ card, lose a turn.  The student who first covers all their grill items is the game winner.  Download it on TpT and don’t forget to leave feedback if you grab it! I’m giving away 2 free copies – just enter on rafflecopter below!  a Rafflecopter giveaway

Lovely comments

  1. 1

    says

    I am a special educator working with students that receive speech services 3 – 5 days/week. I work on syllables for speech articulation as well as for phonemic activities. This game looks wonderful. dbednarsk@yahoo.com

  2. 4

    says

    I work on slowly saying the word, and breaking it up into the syllables of the word (so for butterfly, it would be but/er/fly” slowly until they can combine at a regular rate

  3. 10

    says

    My kiddos really like pacing activities like clapping, counting on fingers, or pacing boards… and hopefully Grillin’ with Syllables! :)

  4. 11

    Lisa Reyes says

    Always love you products, Jenna! My kiddos like clapping or sliding tokens when working on syllables.

  5. 16

    says

    My students like seeing their progress or to a tangible reward- colored mini marshmallows are a favorite- one marshmallow for each syllable said correctly! If they miss a syllable – I get that marshmallow.

  6. 17

    says

    This is so cute. We clap syllables. I usually have flashcards with the words broken into syllables that I use initially. Then we transition to just words on the cards with decreased cuing. I also do a lot of syllable sorting.

  7. 19

    says

    I break up words onto note cards and have the kids put them together. I like to use the cue of putting your hand under your chin and counting how many times the chin comes down. That helps my littles!

  8. 29

    says

    I use multi-syllable words all the time in my artic sessions, language sessions, phonemic work….It comes up all the time with kids….Thanks again.
    diane

  9. 30

    says

    I too use multisyllabic words for artic and language as well as phonemic awareness (sound segmenting and sound blending) Looks like fun! Thanks Jenna!

  10. 31

    says

    I work on multisyllabic words by trying to add some type of visual representation for each syllable, dots on a paper, blocks, etc.

  11. 32

    says

    I use whatever seems to work for a kiddo- often clapping out syllables, or using manipulatives like blocks or soft foam alphabet letters for representing the start of each syllable segment. This game looks like a fun addition for the tool kit!

  12. 36

    says

    colored blocks or bingo chips. A different color to represent every syllable. clapping and tapping (but then sometimes they lose count ;)

  13. 39

    Anonymous says

    Great activity, cute graphics! To produce all syllables, I make a visual with numbered blocks or have students count on their fingers.

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  16. 54

    Anonymous says

    We tap, clap, count and segment using visuals! This activity would be great for my students!

  17. 58

    says

    Like many people above, I use tapping and clapping for multisyllabic words. I have also used my DIY pacing “beads”. I use a string with a few different large sized beads (depending on how many syllables I am working on). The student taps or slides a bead for each syllable in a word. Your grillin’ syllables activity looks FANTASTIC!!! I know my students would enjoy this. I absolutely love that you have included pictures as well!!!!

  18. 59

    Anonymous says

    Such cute graphics! Also, it’s nice to have a good list of multi-syllabic words!

  19. 60

    says

    I use tapping and clapping to work on multisyllabic words. I’ve also use pacing boards or beads to work on multisyllabic words.

  20. 62

    WendyP says

    With my preschoolers, we do a lot of tapping on the table or our arms to mark syllables. I also often use a sing-song voice with certain kids, to emphasize the separate syllables.

  21. 80

    Lora says

    My students love getting to learn new multisyllabic words! We use all sorts of different gestures, clapping, tapping, etc to sound them out. This activity is so cute! My students will love it this summer

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