Tense Builder {review & giveaway}

Tense Builder is the newest app in the line from the Mobile Education Store. All the apps Kyle develops are stellar and I couldn’t wait to test this one out. I’ve had in on my ipad for a few weeks and wanted to share a review with you today. Tense Builder is like YouTube for the Speech Room. The video factor had my groups eagerly grabbing for their turn at the app. So what do you get for the $14.99 app? 42 verbs are targeted (with an expansion planned).  Each of the verbs includes the video clip to demonstrate past, present or future tasks. The movie clips are perfectly suited for our young ones. They use humor and portray age appropriate animations. One of things I love best about this app is the positive benefit for our students on the spectrum. Several of my youngster have benefitted from practicing verbs while seeing it happen rather than looking at a ‘photo’ of a verb. A verb is an action after all! Each video demonstrates the tenses and then prompts to the student to pick a picture that matches the tense demonstrated. For example in the photo above, The child is prompted to identify which picture shows the man WILL FINISH the painting. After the student identifies the correct image, an expressive task is presented. Students use the verb form in a sentence to complete the task.  The clinician has control of which verbs are targeted, with the ability to focus on just one tense. Data collection is easily emailed or saved to the device The Mobile Education Store wants to give one copy of Tense Builder to a lucky Speech Room News Follower. Enter in the rafflecopter below! To keep up on all the latest news join the Mobile Education Newsletter  http://mobile-educationstore.com/signup. a Rafflecopter giveaway

Lovely comments

  1. 6

    Anonymous says

    I use the superduperinc card packs but love the idea of teaching the irregular verbs in rhyming clusters.

  2. 11

    Jess Goodfred says

    We play Simon Says when learning verbs. “What did __ do?” “___ jumped.” or “What will we do next?” “We will kick.”

  3. 12

    AmySLP says

    I don’t have a “favorite” way yet! I am back in the school setting after 7 years in skilled nursing. I am still figuring out my “favorite” way teach verbs. Kids have loved a “Phineas and Verb” game that I found on Pinterest.

  4. 14

    says

    With my older kids I use Jenga blocks. I have verbs glued to the blocks and as they pull a block we discuss the verb or I have them use the verb in a sentence.

  5. 23

    says

    WOW…I love all of these ideas. I haven’t had to teach verb tense in a while…and now I have a lot of children that need it.

  6. 24

    Christina says

    Love having students create an action, make the complete sentence….then turn that present action sentence into past (eg. yesterday, last week) and future (eg. tomorrow, next week).

  7. 31

    Anonymous says

    I usually use the Irregular Verbs Fun Deck (cards) or Speech with Milo: Verbs (app). Thanks for the chance to win!
    Tracey F

  8. 37

    danielle says

    I use whatever cards I have on hand that show any kind of action happening, then make up a story where the ending is a summation of the action that happened in the story (i.e. past tense) I leave it up to the kids to “finish” the story… since there’s no guidelines the stories can get hilarious, and fun of course!

  9. 39

    says

    To teach verb tenses, I use a story from the classroom or we use play binoculars and “spy” kids in the room doing things and comment on them as they happen. Thanks everyone for the great ideas!

  10. 41

    Julie says

    I like to use my camera and take pictures of the kids demonstrating a variety of actions in their classroom/around the school, then we use those pictures for a variety of activities.

  11. 42

    says

    I have a verb bingo game that I like. I also have them tell me what they did yesterday, what they are doing now, and what they plan to do tomorrow, using the phrases, ‘Yesterday I….’, ‘Today I…..’, and ‘Tomorrow I will…..’.

  12. 43

    says

    I use the Super Duper decks. One of my colleagues also showed me to take pictures with my IPhone/Ipad. I start taking pictures of students doing various actions. We talk about what they are doing as we take the picture (present), what they did in the pictures when we get back to my room (past), and plan what actions we will do next session (future) which we write down so we remember.Ofcourse I make sure we do some irregular verbs like throw, bring, draw, eat, drink, etc. Students love that the pictures are of them and I email them to myself, print them off and send them home with the student for practice.

  13. 45

    says

    I like to use Super Duper decks. I’ve had them around for quite a while but they are still goodies. I can take a handful to do therapy on the go when I push in to kindergarten or set up activities back in my room.

  14. 49

    says

    As much as possible I like to include movement/action when teaching verbs (for preschoolers). It makes it more concrete for them. I have little songs that I have made up that go with them describing what we are doing and then afterwards you are able to target the past tense.

  15. 53

    Rachel says

    I always have the students tell me something they did the day before, using the carrier phrase, “Yesterday I…”
    I’ve also had them make an -ed chart based on what the ending of the word sounds like (/t/, /d/, -id). My newest activity revolves around the StoryCubes Actions cubes (very reasonable in cost)… they kids write or tell a story using the action cubes and then are challenged to change the story into past or future tense!

  16. 54

    says

    I use a combination of materials but I prefer letting the kids act out various actions and then discuss what they are doing and what they just did. Movement helps!

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